Comfort Cove Wildflower Walk

FeaturedComfort Cove Wildflower Walk

The best that can be said of my knowledge of wildflowers is that I know very little but I like them. I like learning about them, searching for their identification through books,  asking other people,  from wildflower experts and the Wildflowers of Newfoundland and Labrador FB page.

Some friends and I did a little walk about the Cove on a lovely sunny morning and together we studied the wildflowers growing by the side of the road in Comfort Cove. These I believe are pretty common wildflowers but oh so pretty.

Wild madder/Bedstraw

This one took a little time, but was ID’d by members of  Wildflowers of Newfoundland and Labrador.  It is further described as a roadside mix, dumped by contractors doing road work. I, for one, am so glad they did…growing all along the roadside of Comfort Cove-Newstead they make quite the visual statement.

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I took this picture on one of my solo walks in Newstead. A variety of Daisy…Ox eye, English, some other???? not sure. As children we called them Bachelor Buttons and would pull off the petals one by one, reciting “he loves me, he loves me not.”

St. John’s Wort

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I like wildflowers, I like how they grow anywhere…in fields, among rocks, bogs, roadsides, between old boards, barrels, on barrens…simply wherever they feel like it.  They always seem so happy and free and for the most part co-exist happily together, sometimes invading each other’s space.

 

On a recent medicine walk in Woody Point NL, I learned that the leaves of the common Yarrow can be inserted in wounds to stop bleeding. Also the whole plant can be thrown in a fire to drive away flies.

 

You belong among the wildflowers

You belong in a boat out at sea

Sail away, kill off the hours

You belong somewhere you feel free.     Wildflowers  by Tom Petty

Cow Vetch
Cow Vetch

Bring your enthusiasm for life with you everywhere you go, and it will be contagious.   Dr. Bernie S. Siegel

 

 

Butter and Eggs

 

Butter and Eggs

Butter and Eggs

 

Go outside, walk, walk and then walk some more, see and explore, learn and marvel.

Lomond…..Wildflowers & Beauty Everywhere

Lomond…..Wildflowers & Beauty Everywhere

We went in search of Lomond Campground because we had camped there many years ago when our girls were younger. We were mistakenly directed to Lomond River Lodge and, while I am sure this is a nice camping spot, I knew this wasn’t what I was looking for.

We decided to take Route 431 from Wiltondale and head down towards Woody Point. About 18 km down we saw the sign Lomond Campground  and  the next two days were idyllic. Lomond Campground 1 877 737 3783.

A Little Piece of Heaven

This campground has 29 unserviced sites, but there is water, showers, washrooms and kitchens that are all lovely. It is suitable for smaller campers, Camper Vans, tents, truck campers but not the larger monster (sorry, didn’t mean to write monster:) ) rigs that I see people driving/towing.

We met many people from outside of Newfoundland who were staying here in tents, or in  CVs similar to ours.

One family was here from Quebec with four little boys, ‘like steps of the stairs’ and were staying in two tents. The father said, “we try for girl”  “now no more, we have enough!” :):)

Loosestrife
Loosestrife
Loosestrife
Loosestrife

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Golden hours of vision come to us in this present life when we are at our best.  Dole

Lomond was actually a community back in the mid 1900s, and today, not only do we see glorious wildflowers, but many of the cultivated flowers from the old gardens…….a feast of colour.

All of this and a fellow camper playing  his harmonica!  Heaven was definitely brought down to earth here in Lomond.

Travelling Tea Kettle
Traveling Teakettle……gift from my sister.

We usually eat inside our CV, but on such a gorgeous evening that was unthinkable.

Bog Candle/Scent Bottle Orchid

Up from the beach, and just behind the change station area, you will find a trail that leads to Paynes Cove and the abandoned settlement of Stanleyville.

…….and so….

……………….off we went.

This is an easy trail, although there are some steps, and  is only 4 km return.

Whte-throated Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
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White-throated Sparrow

Self Heal Plant

Along the trail we saw many interesting plants, ferns and birds.  The Wildflower Society of Newfoundland and Labrador is a great resource for me and the members are so willing to help.

Stanleyville Trail, Gros Morne

Smurf houses and ferns

From gardens of long ago…Stanleyville was once a logging community.

After taking a very slow pace to absorb and see, we arrive in  Stanleyville…….people must have found it very difficult to leave this lovely place.

Stanleyville

Fallen
Fallen

A rock outcrop, a hedge, a fallen tree, anything that turns us out of our way, is an excellent thing on a walk.  Thomas A. Clark

My grandmother started walking five miles a day when she was sixty.  She’s ninety-three today and we don’t know where the hell she is.     Ellen DeGeneres

Photos by L & C Fudge

O world, I cannot hold thee close enough!

O world, I cannot hold thee close enough!

Thy winds, thy wide grey skies!

Thy mists that roll and rise!

Thy woods, this autumn day, that ache and sag

And all but cry with colour! That gaunt crag

To crush! To lift the lean of that black bluff!

World, World, I cannot get thee close enough!   Edna St. Vincent Millay

…….actually it came a little too close in the above photo.:)

It was an early morning filled with brilliant sunshine in the Cove (the first in eight days), so we decided to go to Twillingate and hike in the rain:):).

Of course there is a story.

We went to the Women’s Institute Sale first and they were serving ‘light refreshments’……a non-alcoholic punch and homemade treats  that included fruit cake and an assortment of Christmas cookies. I just had to have a piece of fruit cake…….well two actually…….and then we went twacking (Dictionary of Newfoundland English defines it as ‘window shopping’, walking about).

Most all the craft shops are closed for the season but the drugstore in Twillingate is a must because they carry sooo many little home decor and seasonal items, plus beautiful scarves, socks, jewelry,etc. The Dollar Store (very little costs just a dollar) sometimes has  different items too and by this time it was time for lunch.

The Canvas Cove Bistro (check out their Facebook Page) served a delicious buffet lunch….what a spread……..and so I was so full, I had to walk.

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Cousin Debbie introduced me to this trail, Lower Little Harbour, earlier this year but I hadn’t done the extra 3.6 km over the headland to Jonas Cove.

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Northern Wild Raisin

This shrub caught my attention because of its lovely colour, it really stood out in the grey of the day. I find the  Wildflower Society of Newfoundland and Labrador and Todd Boland’s Field Guide, Trees & Shrubs Newfoundland and Labrador  very helpful when I am not sure of a plant’s identity.

All photos by L. Fudge

We usually take our hiking footwear and clothes on our travels, but this time I forgot my gloves…..

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….but I did have an extra pair of socks which worked very well!

At first it was only overcast, then misty and then it rained, but the cool air and barren, rugged scenery were a joy.

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Turr Hunters?

There are a couple of signs, one says Jonas, the other Jones….but they are referring to the same Cove………maybe Jonas Jones lived there once upon a time?:):)

The complete  Lower Little Harbour Trail is about 5km.

img_7917-800x533Juniper Berries

They are used in the making of gin, lovely added to a drink  with gin, and are also used when cooking wild game.

If you Google Lower Little Harbour Trail Twillingate, you will get mixed reviews on the difficulty of this trail, all however state that there are a couple of “challenging” areas.  Tripadvisor is a good place to check for reviews and photos.

Uphill and …..

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…….down, the trail continues.

This had me laughing aloud with glee… the ocean rose at the entrance, came back down and rushed into the little ‘channel’, hitting the rocks with fury. Delightful!

 We reached Jonas Cove after a lovely hike and walked back out on a much shorter path to the community of Little Harbour, not to be confused with Lower Little Harbour.:)

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Old church in Little Harbour, Twillingate.

If you would like more on this trail, please check my blog post of April 16,2016.

I cannot endure to waste anything so precious as autumnal sunshine by staying in the house. Nathaniel Hawthorne