A Short Tale With the Possiblity of Unlimited Treks

FeaturedA Short Tale With the Possiblity of Unlimited Treks

What kind of life can you have in a house without books? Sherman Alexie

A house without books is certainly not one I would want and parents and grandparents who do not read to their children are not people I understand.

 

Digging the hole for the post.

Little Free Libraries are found all over the world and having seen them in various locations in our province, I wanted one. Seeing  and reading about the one in Green’s Harbour, Trinty Bay closed the deal for me. Thankfully my husband agree to make me one and because the ground was frozen, it had to wait until this week to be erected.

 

This is now extra special because two of our grandchildren are here and helped us with the set up.

Children are made readers on the laps of their parents.  Emilie Buchwald

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Preparing to cut the ribbon.

 

Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries.   Anne Herbert

I am blessed in that even though my grandchildren love their devices, they are avid readers.

 

Official Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

 

I am thrilled that two people have already stopped by to get  books and another left some books.

Fill your house with stacks of books, in all the crannies and all the nooks.  Dr. Seuss

 

The sign reads “Take a book, leave a book”, but if you don’t have one to leave, please feel free to take one and….. spread the word.

Corner of Elderberry Lane and Poplar Road, Comfort Cove.

I always read. You know how sharks have to keep swimming or they die? I’m like that. If I stop reading, I die.  Patrick Rothfuss

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cull’s Point Lookout Trail

FeaturedCull’s Point Lookout Trail

….gets some clearing and some new signs.

 

 

The trail from the sign in to the actual lookout is approximately 1/2 km and today is still snow covered in places.

We are very fortunate here in the Cove that in 1977, Kevin Head and 15 others developed this trail as a part of a summer works program.  Later Gordon White,  Keith Copper and others involved with the town council at the time (still gathering information on this)  made the trail longer and  it now goes around the headlands and coves, ending near the Wild Bight Road. This is not a long trail, ( approximately 3 km return) but I find it quite relaxing and peaceful.

 

 

Tenacity

 

 

 

New signs

 

 

This first lookout along the trail is perhaps my favourite. It is a great place to stop and maybe have a cup of tea, being careful not to go too close to the edge of the cliff. Later there will probably be an Osprey’s nest on the top of the sea stack. We have stopped to watch the birds guard the nest when out in our boat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I absolutely love this lichen on the white spruce and want to decorate  them with red berries. 🙂

 

 

 

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These windfalls and others have now been cleared.

 

 

A beautiful day, sunny and warm on March 31!

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The trail as of today is quite slippery in places. Hiking stick(s) and cleats are recommended.

 

 

 

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Doctor’s Hill

In the background you can see Doctor’s Hill

Is there anything that is better than to be out walking in the clear air?  In Praise of Walking by Thomas A. Clark

 

A Short Tale of Wildflowers

A Short Tale of Wildflowers

White’s wharf in Comfort Cove has been around for many years and has been photographed many times. Many family boats have  tied up here over the years and it has, at times, been quite busy; but, it was only today that I really focused on the variety of wildflowers that grow there.

Oxeye Daisies

Cow Vetch

 

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Columbine……perhaps came from my mother’s or aunt’s garden many years ago.

 

Columbine

 

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“Like wildflowers, you must allow yourself to grow in all the places people thought you never would”. –E.V.

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A flake of bluebells (harebells).

The flake was laid against the side of the cliff and the flowers have grown up through it.

You belong among the wildflowers.

You belong in a boat out at sea.

You belong with your love on your arm.

You belong somewhere you feel free.–Tom Petty

 

The Common Tansy, White Clover and Bittersweet Nightshade also grow here underneath the cliff and along the side of the path. The nightshade is so pretty when in bloom, but is poisonous. Todd Boland’s book Wildflowers and Ferns of Newfoundland is an excellent resource tool.

Happiness is buttercups

and grasses grown waist high

Happiness is the sun on your face

Birds on the wind and a butterfly…….

Hettie (White) Sarson

 

I will keep looking for more wildflowers around the wharf and I will………

 

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try to always find the extraordinary in the ordinary.

A Sunday Trek along Bight Road

A Sunday Trek along Bight Road

Walking gives freedom. When you walk you can determine your own tempo. You can choose your own course. You can think whatever you want. Nina Kuscik

A beautiful fall day along the Wild Bight Road.

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The times they are a’changin.
While I don’t see Bob Dylan in this setting, his words ring true.

Peaceful and serene.

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The little red tractor….sure miss stopping and talking to Gerald Head.

Dogberries are so plentiful this year….and so beautiful as they add their splash of colour to the landscape.

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Thankfully there is no change here, the colours are vibrant.

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A lazy Sunday in the fields.

October’s Party by George Cooper

October gave a party
The leaves by hundreds came-
The Chestnuts, Oaks, and Maples,
And leaves of every name.
The Sunshine spread a carpet,
And everything was grand,
Miss Weather led the dancing,
Professor Wind the band.

The Chestnuts came in yellow,
The Oaks in crimson dressed;
The lovely Misses Maple
In scarlet looked their best;
All balanced to their partners,
And gaily fluttered by;
The sight was like a rainbow
New fallen from the sky.

Then, in the rustic hollow,
At hide-and-seek they played,
The party closed at sundown,
And everybody stayed.
Professor Wind played louder;
They flew along the ground;
And then the party ended
In jolly “hands around.”

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October dressing for her pool party.

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Bight Road

O world, I cannot hold thee close enough!
Thy winds,thy wide grey skies!
The mists that roll and rise!
Thy woods, this autumn day, that ache and sag
All all but cry with colour! That gaunt crag
To crush! To lift the lean of that black bluff!
World, World, I cannot hold thee close enough!

Edna St. Vincent Millay

A Trek around the Cove.

A Trek around the Cove.

A chilly December morning but everything still looks scenic.

“Silence begets Reverence”……..fr. Adventure Canada Video

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Through my father’s eyes.

The crow is busy eating his breakfast on Uncle Allan’s bench and I love the colourful buoys with the mussels still attached.

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Bittersweet Nightshade   Solanum dulcamara

Identified with the help of the Wildflower Society .  Todd Boland’s  field guide, Trees & Shrubs of Newfoundland and Labrador is also an excellent reference. Another handy reference, Wild Flowers of Newfoundland Canada by Bill and June Titford is usually in my knapsack when I hike. This is a much older book but is still very useful.

Continuing on our walk, we come to what used to be Lewis and Elsie Head’s store. When I was a child, every Saturday morning one of us would have to walk here to buy groceries for mom.

The tide sure is high this morning.

And then we walk to the end of Cove Road and turn down Church Road. The roads had no names when I was growing up here, simply ‘up around the cove’ or ‘in the back way’.

Bethel United Church on the left and then this unique blue building on the right.

I always grin when I pass this building, not so much because it is a blend of two architectural styles, but because it is a blend of two religious denominations!  When I was growing up here, the longer one (with truck parked in front of it) was the Salvation Army Citadel and the one with the higher peak and white doors, was the United Church. People from the Salvation Army went to one school and used the back road in the community and people who were United attended a different school and used the cove road to get there! Many years later, the local fish plant obtained them and eventually joined them together and here they stand………. harmoniously together:)

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Continuing on our trek, approaching Newstead or already in Newstead? I am not sure where the boundary is.

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Wharf Demolition.

The old Government Wharf in Newstead has been deemed unsafe and is being torn down.

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Solomon’s Island Bird Sanctuary

Solomon’s Island and Newstead Harbour

Trekking along down Harbour View Drive or is  it Ocean View …..will have to take a closer look on my next trek.

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Saw this interesting contraption by the side of the road and thought it was handmade……I have seen some interesting and imaginative creations being used and driven here. The owner was nearby and so I asked him if he had made it, but no, it was bought somewhere in St. John’s.

 Our 5 km trek has come to an end, hope you enjoyed the scenery.

Our life is frittered away by detail….Simplify, simplify.  Henry David Thoreau

All photos by L. Fudge