Maple Ridge Trail Triton, NL

FeaturedMaple Ridge Trail Triton, NL

Come with me and we will explore Maple Ridge Trail…… but first let’s take a stroll around Triton and view the town’s bus shelters….yes, you read that correctly.

I always promote reading and really, really like this one

Amazing.

…and yes we all need to give thanks to our firefighters.

Put a window in this one, some sort of door for inclement weather, give me a stack of books and I am not coming out to catch the bus. 🙂

They are all works of art, such talent.

http://www.townoftriton.ca

It’s time to hike the trail. It’s rated moderate-extreme not because of the length of the trail but because of the number of steps.

I have two doctors, my left leg and my right.

G. M. Trevelyan

Nice to get your bearings and see where you are!

I`ve hiked enough coastal trails to know that when I see steps going down, it usually means I am going to be climbing up very soon.

A beautiful fall day in Triton, Newfoundland.

Go and explore!

Comfort Cove…..October’s Party

FeaturedComfort Cove…..October’s  Party

We are celebrating our fall season in Newfoundland, Canada and October has been a glorious month to date. Comfort Cove, located on the island’s northeast coast, is dressed in my favorite colours. My hike today meandered onto Bight Road and my senses were on full alert.

Nature is not a place to visit, it is home.

Forest Photography, Wise Nature Saying

October’s Party

by George Cooper

October gave a party;

The leaves by hundreds came

The Chestnuts, Oaks and Maples,

And leaves of every name.

The Sunshine spread a carpet,

And everything was grand,

Miss Weather led the dancing,

Professor Wind the band.

The Chestnuts came in yellow,

The Oaks in crimson dressed,

The lovely Misses Maple

In scarlet looked their best;

All balanced to their partners,

And gaily fluttered by;

The sight was like a rainbow

New fallen from the sky.

Then, in the rustic hollow,

At hide-and-seek they played,

The party closed at sundown,

And everybody stayed,

Professor Wind played louder;

They flew along the ground;

And then the party ended

In jolly “hands around.”

Cheerful Charlie is visiting from Nova Scotia

………………..and stops by for a visit with Gerald, a man we all miss on Bight Road.

…………..and then I make my way gnome to my little forest.

Rose Blanche Lighthouse

Rose Blanche is located on the southwest shore of Newfoundland on route 470, approximately 45 km from Port Aux Basques. Allow extra time for traveling this route, for although the road is in good condition, it winds along the coast with many turns and twists. The Lighthouse is accessed by an easy walking, circular, gravel … Continue reading Rose Blanche Lighthouse

Rose Blanche Lighthouse

FeaturedRose Blanche Lighthouse

Rose Blanche is located on the southwest shore of Newfoundland on route 470, approximately 45 km from Port Aux Basques. Allow extra time for traveling this route, for although the road is in good condition, it winds along the coast with many turns and twists.

The lighthouse was built with stone from a local granite quarry.

The Lighthouse is accessed by an easy walking, circular, gravel trail that showcases spectacular views of both the ocean and the harbour. Midway around the trail is the historic Rose Blanche Lighthouse, originally built in 1871 and restored in 1999. Rose Blanche Lighthouse Inc. has dedicated this restored lighthouse to all those mariners who sail our shores and the lights and their keepers that bring them home.

http://roseblanchelighthouse.ca

A short beautiful walk brings you face to face with so much history…………….Robert Louis Stevenson connections, wow!

The building was likely designed by either Oake or J.T. Neville, with D & Stevenson, lighthouse engineers from Edinburgh, Scotland advising, designing and supplying the original lighting apparatus. The company, named after the father and uncle of Robert Louis Stevenson, designed a number of lighthouses in the UK and Newfoundland, including the one at Ferryland.

heritage.nf.ca

Love these stones.

During the 70 years in which the lighthouse operated, it had 6 light keepers…..John A. Roberts, John Cook, Bruce Cook, Philip Hatcher, James Skinner and it seems as if Philip Hatcher did a second term and was the last keeper to work here. Oh, to have interviewed them! They must have experienced some ferocious storms.

We have a light upon our house, and it gives hope to all who sail upon the stormy seas. Do ya know what it means to have a light burning atop your home? It is safety, a place of refuge, seen by all that as a signal that ye stand for something greater than this world, greater than us all.

James Michael Pratt, The Lighthouse Keeper

There are always new places to explore in Newfoundland!

    Isle aux Morts

    FeaturedIsle aux Morts

    Situated on the rugged shoreline of Newfoundland’s South West Coast, Isle aux Morts is a perfect destination for visitors looking for breathtaking scenery. Hills carpeted in reds, greens and gold of Newfoundland’s mossy terrain surround the “Island of the Dead”, a fitting name considering the hundreds of ships and lives that have been lost off the Isle aux Morts Coast.

    isleauxmorts.ca Town of Isle aux Morts

    We had a lovely lunch at the entrance of Isle aux Morts, overlooking the Boat Cove Trail. Because of time constraints, we were unable to walk the Harvey Trail but so look forward to returning to this area.

    We did the short trail down to Boat Cove Pond making note of the flora along the way. Asters, Canada Burnet (bottle brush) and pitcher plants, to name a few.

    Imagine! An interesting story.

    Boat Cove Pond, Isle aux Morts

    In 1828 the Harvey family, with the aid of their Newfoundland dog, “Hairyman”, rescued 163 people from the sinking brig “Despatch”, shipwrecked on the rocks off Isle aux Morts. They made another daring rescue in 1838, saving 25 crew members from the Glasgow ship, the “Rankin”. The present day Coast Guard Ship, “Ann Harvey”, is named in memory of the daughter of George Harvey who, while she was only 17 years old, assisted in these heroic deeds.

    isleauxmorts.ca Town of Isle aux Morts

    Get both physical and mental exercise…….visit the town of Isle aux Morts.

    Isle aux Morts

    Isle aux Morts

    Situated on the rugged shoreline of Newfoundland’s South West Coast, Isle aux Morts is a perfect destination for visitors looking for breathtaking scenery. Hills carpeted in reds, greens and gold of Newfoundland’s mossy terrain surround the “Island of the Dead”, a fitting name considering the hundreds of ships and lives that have been lost off … Continue reading Isle aux Morts

    Exploring Rencontre East

    Rencontre East is located in Fortune Bay on the South Coast of Newfoundland and is accessible by ferry……. just foot traffic, no vehicles. The trip is approximately 1 hr 45 mins one way and offers amazing views of the coast. We also saw many different seabirds, whales and several schools of dolphins. The current population … Continue reading Exploring Rencontre East

    Goodyear’s Cove Trails

    FeaturedGoodyear’s Cove Trails

    Goodyear’s Cove is a great little campground located just outside of South Brook, NL and has a few short trails to keep you active. The park has been in operation now for approximately 55 years and has had many upgrades.

    We were very fortunate in having the mayor of South Brook register us for our campground. Don is a delightful, interesting man who has overcome many life challenges and still has an amazing sense of humour.

    Come with me, the view from the top is worth the climb.

    Climbing uphill, the horizon grows wider;

    In Praise of Walking Thomas A. Clark

    ….descending, the hills gather round.

    In Praise of Walking Thomas A. Clark

    Another short but peaceful trail goes around the pond. A lovely early morning walk.

    Walking is good for solving problems…it’s like the feet are little psychiatrists.

    Terri Guillemets

    Exploring Rencontre East

    FeaturedExploring Rencontre East

    Rencontre East is located in Fortune Bay on the South Coast of Newfoundland and is accessible by ferry……. just foot traffic, no vehicles. The trip is approximately 1 hr 45 mins one way and offers amazing views of the coast. We also saw many different seabirds, whales and several schools of dolphins.

    ……and they really do!

    The current population of this most interesting place is 120 with 22 school children. One student graduated this year and won a prestigious scholarship!

    Welcoming committee.
    Just in case you doubt that they don’t…….they thought they would say it again.

    This is a community that is surviving and appears to be doing well because of aquaculture, people who come to explore in the summer (there are three B & Bs here owned by the same couple who offer a variety of outdoor adventures), and because some work away ….weeks on/weeks off. There are two general stores, a post office and a small health clinic which I find impressive …..many of these small communities are not as fortunate.

    …and of course we did the trail around the pond, unfortunately we didn’t get to do the trail to the lake. A return visit with a longer stay is on my bucket list….have to stay at the Chart House and do some more exploring.

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    Go….explore Newfoundland and Labrador.

    The most lonely places are the most lovely.

    In Praise of Walking Thomas A. Clark

    Gun Hill Trail, Trinity NL

    FeaturedGun Hill Trail, Trinity NL

    Having done a portion of the Gun Hill Trail previously, we opted to do the Lower Gun Hill Trail. This trail goes through the woods around the base of the hill and also leads to the ocean and back to beautiful Trinity. An easy trail with a little incline.

    The trail begins behind the Royal Bank and finishes behind Rising Tide Theater. At the beginning of the trail is this beautiful heritage home and gardens.

    Beginning of trail

    The trail passes an old graveyard………………..

    After doing some research, I found the answers.

    http://www.newfoundlandshipwrecks.com

    Lion  

    Vessel Registry
    Owner
    Registration No.
    Official No.
    Vessel Name
    Place Constructed
    Year Constructed
    No. of Decks
    No. of Masts
    Type of Vessel

    Length (ft)
    Width (ft)
    Depth (ft)
    Gross Tonnage
    Net Tonnage
    Year Registered
    Official Closure Year
    Place of Closure
    Actual Closure Date



    Walter Grieve & Co
    S866106
    052320
    Lion
    Greenspond, Bonavista Bay
    1866
    2
    2
    Steam/Sail

    140
    28
    16
    393
    292
    1866
    1882
    Trinity Bay, NL
    1882
    The S.S. Lion was another vessel whose loss at sea had a devastating impact on Trinity and the surrounding small communities as they lost some of their most prominent citizens when this vessel went down in the Baccalieu Tickle on January 6, 1882. Included amongst them was The LionCaptain Patrick Fowlow of the nearby community of Trinity East, a well skilled Captain, Rev. Hugh Foster and his wife who were coming to take up duties in the Parish of Trinity, as well as Charles Power, a well established merchant. The images and documents that you will see and read concerning the mysterious loss of this vessel will make you wonder about what actually happened on that fateful night, what happened to the wreckage and the bodies of those on board, as only that of Mrs. Cross was found floating onshore. Listen to Mrs. Florence Barbour give an account of her grandmother’s sixth sense prediction about the Lion being lost and see if you can figure out what happened to the Lion that night.  
    Images   AudioDocuments
    Click the link above and discover more information on the SS Lion

    Go, explore our beautiful province.

    It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.

    Country Living

    photos C & L Fudge

    Chamber Cove Trail…..learning about one of the worst disasters in United States Naval history.

    FeaturedChamber Cove Trail…..learning about one of the worst disasters in United States Naval history.

    This is a short trail, approximately 4 km return. After walking the dirt path/road that leads to the Cove, the scenery is spectacular.

    On February 18, 1942 an horrific naval disaster occurred on

    Newfoundland’s south coast.

    Click the link above and read this horrific and heroic story.

    The Truxtun was trapped in Chamber Cove and the Pollux about one and a half miles west at Lawn Point. The Truxtun was carrying 156 men and the Pollux 233. For hours, these men fought to survive in the driving sleet, howling wind, and bitter cold of the North Atlantic.

    The Story – Dead Reckoning: The Pollux-Truxtun Disaster

    This trail should be on everyone’s bucket list. This disaster has been documented many times and I am sure almost everyone knows of Lanier W. Phillips. Seeing the actual sight on a warm summer’s day with calm seas, it is still difficult to comprehend how 186 (203 died) men were saved. A terrible storm, giant waves, a gruesome death but bravery and compassion were also evident on that terrible night.

    Standing Into Danger by Cassie Brown tells the story of the shipwrecks and the rescue and is available on Amazon.

    Go, explore and learn about the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Trekking around Squires Island

    FeaturedTrekking around Squires Island

    The area of Notre Dame Bay around  Comfort Cove-Newstead is not known for its sandy beaches. It is however, ideal for kayaking and exploring. The bay is dotted with islands, some large, some small. On this particular day we decided to explore one of the smaller islands and traveled there in our boat with  family members.

     

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    What will we find, what will we see…….

    Searching for wildflowers.

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    Roseroot…..Rhodiola rosea

     

    Like wildflowers, you must allow yourself to grow in all the places people thought you never would.

     

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    Sea urchin & blackberries…a winning combination.

     

    My favourite scent…blackberry bushes.

    Exploring is one of my favourite things to do……. exploring with daughters and grandchildren is even nicer.

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    A boil up is an old tradition in my family. These mussels were small but oh so tasty.

     

    My photo tribute to Newfoundland artist Gerald Squires.

     

    Rocky beaches & driftwood fires with family and Ginger, the saltwater dog.

     

    Use all your senses and go…..explore.

     

     

    Trekking through Mary March Wilderness Park…..

    FeaturedTrekking through Mary March Wilderness Park…..

    ……on the shores of Red Indian Lake. Red Indian Lake is the second longest lake on the island portion of Newfoundland and Labrador. It is 64.4 km long and averages 5.8 km in width.  Mary March Wilderness Park is located near Buchans Junction and has been privately owned for 25 years.

     

    Wild irises are everywhere.

    Textures.

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    A great way to start the day.

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    A hammock tent!

    Defying the odds.

    The owners keep animals at the park. The pig and goat share a home and are best buds.  Their daughter’s dog used to live with them too but decided to move out, they do however, remain the best of friends.:) I was told that sometimes you can see the daughter, followed by her dog, then the pig and finally the goat at the rear, walking on the beach.

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    Chaga?

     

     

    Mary March Wilderness Park, Newfoundland & Labrador

    If you love glamping and enjoy posh settings when you camp, this may not be the place for you. If you like seeing the world from a different perspective, go…walk the shoreline of the lake, see the shore birds, walk in the woods and listen to the song birds, study the trees, listen to the loons at night, see how nature thrives on the rocky shores, light a soothing campfire, breath deeply and relax totally.

    Everything we meet is equally important or unimportant.

    In Praise of Walking…..Thomas A. Clark

    Greenspond NL…..Hub of the North

    FeaturedGreenspond NL…..Hub of the North

    Greenspond was first settled in the1690s and is situated in the Bonivista North area on the northeast coast of Newfoundland.

    I recommend this community for your staycation 2020.    Scenic…at times wild…… at times serene, but never dull to your senses.

     

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    Beautiful Greenspond, NL

     

    Check out Ida’s Place before you hike, that way you will at least  burn off some of the calories!

     

    Check out their Facebook page, go talk to the owners, inquire about their story….I discovered I had both people AND  place connections to both husband and wife! Ask about the history of the house, sit, relax and enjoy.

     

    We first attempted to walk the Greenspond Hiking Trail in August of 2016, but the wind and rain were so ferocious  that we had to turn back. We finally completed it a couple of weeks ago.  My phone with my Map My Walk App died shortly after beginning the trail and I didn’t log my kms,  but I was told that the trail is 6 kms in length.