A Twillingate Trek on Batrix Island Trail with a Culinary Tale

FeaturedA Twillingate Trek on Batrix Island Trail with a Culinary Tale

Unscripted Twillingate     is a four day celebration of digital arts which began four years ago. Each year, each day offers many events/workshops to enjoy. This year I purchased a ticket for Fire Food and Photography and Crystal Anstey from Experience Twillingate did not disappoint!

The group met at Twillingate museum and walked approximately 15 minutes  in Back Harbour to Batrix Island. The information on this trail has the starting point from Main Street and lists its difficulty level as  moderate. I believe that is referring to the last climb to the top which is a little steep.

Along the way we did a little foraging for berries and edible  plants, with Crystal sharing information on identifying and usage. It was a gorgeous, windy day with awe-inspiring views.

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…..and then we arrived. A dining table on Batrix Island beach…sure why not!!!!

The purpose of life is to live it, to taste experience to the utmost, to reach out eagerly and without fear for newer and richer experiences.  Eleanor Roosevelt

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While we were waiting for the food to be prepared, a few of us walked to the top of Batrix Island ….so glad I did.

There’s dining and then there’s dining. 🙂

Food by Crystal………….

……..decor by Mother Earth.

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A little discussion on plating and each of us did our own arrangement…..think mine looks pretty good…and the food was delicious.

It was all cooked over an open fire on a beach with sun and sea, with new friends and laughter.  Thank you Crystal Anstey!

 

Lost City Found In Burgeo……

FeaturedLost City Found In Burgeo……

……..Italy has Pompeii, Burgeo Newfoundland has Sandbanks.

 

It’s not an old book, or a treasure map. Nope. Staring up at me was a pile of rocks.   Wendy Mass, Jeremy Fink and the Measure of Life

For the first time in my life I find myself wishing I had studied geology.  I always get a feeling of joy when picking up a smooth, warm rock….I close my eyes and feel my daughters’ little hand in mine and, in more recent years, my grandchildren’s. The texture and smoothness of these rocks on the beach at Sandbanks Provincial Park in  Burgeo will be with me always. Because they appear to be made from many tiny rocks, I expected them to be course and rough to the touch, the opposite was true. Running my hand over them on many of my treks, I felt smoothness….like soapstone. I can only assume ( because I didn’t study geology) that over millions of years the ferocious winds, tides and blowing sands smoothed them into this most awesome state.

On the trails…… totally different, but so visually appealing.

 

Aargh
Aargh!

 

On the trails. How did this get here?……my imagination runs wild.

 

I take another look at the stone, round my fingertips over the meticulous brushstrokes and realize that nothing ever returns to time unless it is stored in mute, voiceless objects; rocks tell tales after all.”   Stefan Hertmans, War & Turpentine

Find my friend in the rock
Find my friend in the rock.

 

 

Displaced

Go…..explore!

Trekking Through Sandbanks Provincial Park, Burgeo.

FeaturedTrekking Through Sandbanks Provincial Park, Burgeo.

Just when I think I have seen the best of Newfoundland, I travel and trek to another. Burgeo is located on the south coast of Newfoundland. Take route 480 approximately 20 minutes west of  the Stephenville turnoff. A two hour ride down this road will bring you to Burgeo, home of the breathtaking Sandbanks Provincial Park.

Piping Plover at Sandbanks Provincial Park.

 

Ethereal
Ethereal……..a foggy mist and a brilliant blue sky.

 

A moment in time.
A moment in time.

 

Free style driftwood art
Driftwood art…free style.

The park is a series of stunning beaches and connecting trails.

Can I stay forever?

“Let’s wander where the WiFi is weak.”

 

Walking: the most ancient exercise and still the most modern. Carrie Latet

Beautiful Sandbanks, Burgeo NL

“And what is the sea?” asked Will.

“The Sea!” cried the miller.

“Lord help us all, it is the greatest thing God made!”   Robert Louis Stevenson

Burgeo, Sandbanks Provincial Park  Part I

Birch Cove Trail, Change Islands

FeaturedBirch Cove Trail, Change Islands

Change Islands

 

This trail is the next, I believe, to see some maintenance work.  The beavers have been very busy in this area.

Beaver Highrise
Beaver High Rise.

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I think it should be called Beaver Trail! Looks as if they have caused some damage, but you have to admire their work ethic.

Windy and sunny in an idyllic location.

Cracker-berry/BunchBerry

 

If you are a nature lover, Change Islands has much to see and do. Take a walkabout, ( a photographer’s and artist’s delight), visit  the  Newfoundland Pony Sanctuary , talk to the locals,  hike on one of several trails on the island, admire the architecture and coastline, study the wildflowers and birds.

When we visited the Pony Sanctuary,  a journalist from Germany was there gathering information to write an article for a magazine in Germany…..a long way from home.:)  Click the Change Islands link above to discover the island and all it has to offer.

Indian Lookout Trail…..

FeaturedIndian Lookout Trail…..

…. located in Change Islands, Newfoundland is a walk that evokes mystical, whimsical fantasies. It is filled with vibrant greens, stunning lichen patterns and tranquility.   It is a short hike, approximately 20 minutes one way.

 

 

 

Magic Forest
Enchanted Forest

 

 

Indian Lookout Trail, Change Islands

 

 

Fascinating lichen patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

A variety of mushrooms.

 

It is worth a thousand pounds a year to have the habit of looking on the bright side of things.  Dr. S. Johnson

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Nearing the top.

 

 

 

Caribou Moss & Partridgeberries.

 

 

 

 

At the top.

 

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Go to Change Islands  breath and just be.

 

To further explore Change Islands, also check these blog posts…..Squid  Jiggers Trail, Change Islands….June 18, 2018 AND A Stroll Through Change Islands, August 7, 2018.

 

Seven Oakes Inn, Change Islands

Susan Abma

Newfoundland Pony Sanctuary

 

 

 

 

Otter Rub/ War Path Trail, Arnold’s Cove

FeaturedOtter Rub/ War Path Trail, Arnold’s Cove

……………..a short trail with a pictorial tale, and a great history lesson.

 

I was very curious as to the name Otter Rub. I did a little research but couldn`t find much information. I read somewhere that the site was so named because at one time there were many otters on the beach and they could be seen rubbing themselves. I`ll go with that.

Just a short walk to the site.

A beautiful little beach.

History lesson in story board form—very interesting.

 

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D`Mericans  were really loved!

 

Another great little trail! Arnold`s Cove NL

 

Eastern Point Trail, Trout River NL

FeaturedEastern Point Trail, Trout River NL

Eastern Point trail begins not too far from this unique scene in Trout River.

 

Trout River, population 552, is located on the west coast of Newfoundland. We had a couple of hours between events at the nearby Writers At Woody Point event and decided to drive to Trout River. We did a little walkabout in the community and then hiked this trail.

 

Not a long hike (3 km return), but very picturesque with a variety of seascapes and wildflowers

 

 

We are all creative.

We are all artists of some kind.

some are better than others,

a few are geniuses.

But we all have a creative spirit.

Allow it to rise up.

Nurture it, challenge it.

Give it freedom.

Celebrate it. 

Patrick Lindsay

 

 

Photo inspired by Gerry Squires

Seeing this, I immediately thought of Newfoundland artist Gerry Squires.

Best known for his dramatic landscape paintings in oil and acrylic, as well as his portraits and surrealist paintings, Squires also worked as a sculptor, print maker and newspaper artist. Squires was born in Change Islands but spent much of his childhood on Exploits.        From a CBC News article October 4, 2015

Potentilla

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Walking is good for solving problems – it’s like the feet are little psychiatrists.    

Terri Guillemets

 

Days of many tales, some trails and glorious wildflower treks.

FeaturedDays of many tales, some trails and glorious wildflower treks.

Writers At Woody Point is an event that has been on my bucket list for a few years and last week my husband and I finally made it happen.  It is five days of storytelling, music and readings by amazing authors. It is  indescribable to have so many new experiences, to hear, and be in the presence of, such talent and such breathtaking scenery.

The veterans will tell you that this is an immersive experience- you don’t so much attend it as live it.  Stephen Brunt, Artistic Director

 

Out and about in Woody Point.

The writers at this year’s event were Melissa Barbeau, Dave Bidini, Lindsay Bird, Jeremy Charles, Megan Gail Coles, Mark Critch, Lorna Crozier, Michael Crummey, Anthony De Sa, Linden MacIntyre, Randall Maggs, Des Walsh and Meg Wolitzer!  There were free events as well as tickets for purchase for others. What a line up! Writers At Woody Point is one class act.          ……..yes Meg Wolitzer , author of The Wife, was there!

 

Meg Wolitzer

……..and she graciously agreed to a picture on our Writers in the Wild trek.

Meg Wolitzer   I bought her newest book, The Female Persuasion and loved it. Check out her other great books through her link.

The line up of hosts was equally impressive…..Shelagh Rogers, Angela Antle, Ian Brown, Tom Power and Miranda Hill.

Musicians and performers were Barney Bentall, Anita Best, Matthew Byrne, Rose Cousins, Dark By Five, Jeremy Dutcher, David Ferry, The Once, Sandy Morris (he’s everywhere! How does he do it?!), Shane Murphy, Jodee Richardson and Sherry Ryan. So much talent.

 

Jeremy Dutcher

I hadn’t planned on attending his concert, but during the day I became intrigued because I heard such phenomenal things about him. Luckily a lady was selling her ticket and my husband was in ‘the right place, at the right time’.  Jeremy is a member of the Tobique First Nation in New Brunswick and

is a classically trained Canadian Indigenous tenor, composer, Musicologist, performer and activist.

A week later and I am still in awe of what I heard and saw.

Between events I went looking for wildflowers in Lomond and Woody Point. Beautiful Asters, Queen of the Meadow, Tansy Ragwort and Joe Pye Weed.

Purple Loosestrive
Purple Loosestrife

 Writers in the Wild did not disappoint. Readings and singing by Meg Wolitzer, Rose Cousins and Jodee Richardson.

As we were walking back the trail, we had another huge surprise waiting! Jeremy Charles of Raymond’s Restaurant was in the bush cooking us ravioli filled with wild rabbit, chanterelle mushrooms and partridgeberries. No words are needed.

 

The following day, members of Qalipu First Nations   end our educational Medicine Walk with soul stirring drumming and chants.

Be proactive and  mark August 13-18, 2020 on your calendar now. Writers At Woody Point will be hosting its 17th annual event.

Comfort Cove Wildflower Walk

FeaturedComfort Cove Wildflower Walk

The best that can be said of my knowledge of wildflowers is that I know very little but I like them. I like learning about them, searching for their identification through books,  asking other people,  from wildflower experts and the Wildflowers of Newfoundland and Labrador FB page.

Some friends and I did a little walk about the Cove on a lovely sunny morning and together we studied the wildflowers growing by the side of the road in Comfort Cove. These I believe are pretty common wildflowers but oh so pretty.

Wild madder/Bedstraw

This one took a little time, but was ID’d by members of  Wildflowers of Newfoundland and Labrador.  It is further described as a roadside mix, dumped by contractors doing road work. I, for one, am so glad they did…growing all along the roadside of Comfort Cove-Newstead they make quite the visual statement.

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I took this picture on one of my solo walks in Newstead. A variety of Daisy…Ox eye, English, some other???? not sure. As children we called them Bachelor Buttons and would pull off the petals one by one, reciting “he loves me, he loves me not.”

St. John’s Wort

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I like wildflowers, I like how they grow anywhere…in fields, among rocks, bogs, roadsides, between old boards, barrels, on barrens…simply wherever they feel like it.  They always seem so happy and free and for the most part co-exist happily together, sometimes invading each other’s space.

 

On a recent medicine walk in Woody Point NL, I learned that the leaves of the common Yarrow can be inserted in wounds to stop bleeding. Also the whole plant can be thrown in a fire to drive away flies.

 

You belong among the wildflowers

You belong in a boat out at sea

Sail away, kill off the hours

You belong somewhere you feel free.     Wildflowers  by Tom Petty

Cow Vetch
Cow Vetch

Bring your enthusiasm for life with you everywhere you go, and it will be contagious.   Dr. Bernie S. Siegel

 

 

Butter and Eggs

 

Butter and Eggs

Butter and Eggs

 

Go outside, walk, walk and then walk some more, see and explore, learn and marvel.

Smith’s Lookout, Twillingate NL

FeaturedSmith’s Lookout, Twillingate NL

Not in the mood to hike one of Twillingate’s fabulous trails ( I have done them before), I walked in Twillingate just looking at the wildflowers.

 

  Cow parsnip, daisies, and the very tenacious bluebell/harebell. I so admire these little flowers.  Just a short way down the road I saw the Smith’s Lookout sign and decided to climb up there again. A very short hike with a great view.

 

A memorial……. and what a fitting site they chose.

 

There are things we will never see, unless we walk to them. In Praise of Walking, Thomas A. Clark

 Explore, see and absorb all that nature has to offer.

Pike’s Arm Lookout….a short trek.

FeaturedPike’s Arm Lookout….a short trek.

Josie’s B&B    Click this link for more information and click accommodations, if you are looking for a place to stay.

Pike’s Arm is located on New World Island, Newfoundland, approximately  20 minutes from Twillingate.

 

tripadvisor reviews refer to this place and trail as a “hidden gem amazing 360 degree views”

 

 

 

I don’t need your praise to survive. I was here first, before you were here, before you ever planted a garden. And I’ll be here when only the sun and moon are left, and the sea, and the wide field. I will constitute the field. The Wild Iris by Louise Gluck

 

 

 

 

 

 

A very small community, but this takes work. A job well done.

We met a tourist from Ontario at the top.  A kindred spirit …goes off the beaten path.

 

Blackberries

My favourite scent…blackberry bushes in summer.

 

Ode to the Blackberry Bush

(with apologies to John Denver)

by Carol Fudge

 

You fill up my senses

with a yearning for long ago moments

like lilacs in summer

like a storm in the cove

like seagulls crying

come fill me again.

Come let me inhale you

let my mind gently wonder

let peace flow through me.

Let me walk through your bushes

let me sit down beside you

let me always remember.
Come let me touch you

come fill me again.

You fill up my senses

like newly cut grass

like the warmth of the sun

like the smell of the ocean

come fill me again.

 

 

Go… explore, go off the beaten path.

Woody’s High Rise………….

FeaturedWoody’s High Rise………….

…….low rental rates, see Woody for further details.

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The Bordeaux Trail in Arnold’s Cove is 12 km  (return) and is rated easy to moderate and what a gem it is!  Personally I know no one who has been to Arnold’s Cove for a vacation and I can’t help wondering why I haven’t spent some time there.  If you check  TripAdvisor etc., it gets great reviews.

 

 

A very picturesque, tidy town with many great ideas implemented.

The Town of Arnold’s Cove is to be congratulated for their initiative. According to Google, the population is  949 (2016) and driving through the town it seems as if it has all the essential services plus a great sense of community pride.

 

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It even has a duck crossing.

 

 

Perfect hiking conditions for me….warm and windy….no flies.:)

 

Pools, walls, solitary trees are natural halting places.   Thomas A. Clark

 

The trail is never boring, everywhere there is something to stir the senses….the ocean, many different kinds of seabirds and songbirds, irises, violets, pitcher plants, ferns,  interesting trees, ponds, beaches, driftwood and humour.

 

Is there anything that is better than to to be out, walking in the clear air?  In Praise of Walking by Thomas A. Clark

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Hello.

 

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Beach Pea

 

 The area is a beachcomber’s delight.

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Tell me your story!

 

Alice Louisa (Adams) Guy was born here in 1899 and died in 2001. She spanned 3 centuries and died at the age of 102! What a beautiful place to enter the world.

20190719_185429 (768x1024)A welcome sight after the hike. Our camper van is perfect for our wandering lifestyle.

If you want to visit Arnold’s Cove (and who wouldn’t) and are looking for a place to stay while you explore, there are several places to choose from.

Check out The Killick Inn and Suites.  

Resized_20190719_165657 (1024x576)Go, see and explore your island home, then your country and then the world!

A Short Tale With the Possiblity of Unlimited Treks

FeaturedA Short Tale With the Possiblity of Unlimited Treks

What kind of life can you have in a house without books? Sherman Alexie

A house without books is certainly not one I would want and parents and grandparents who do not read to their children are not people I understand.

 

Digging the hole for the post.

Little Free Libraries are found all over the world and having seen them in various locations in our province, I wanted one. Seeing  and reading about the one in Green’s Harbour, Trinty Bay closed the deal for me. Thankfully my husband agree to make me one and because the ground was frozen, it had to wait until this week to be erected.

 

This is now extra special because two of our grandchildren are here and helped us with the set up.

Children are made readers on the laps of their parents.  Emilie Buchwald

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Preparing to cut the ribbon.

 

Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries.   Anne Herbert

I am blessed in that even though my grandchildren love their devices, they are avid readers.

 

Official Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

 

I am thrilled that two people have already stopped by to get  books and another left some books.

Fill your house with stacks of books, in all the crannies and all the nooks.  Dr. Seuss

 

The sign reads “Take a book, leave a book”, but if you don’t have one to leave, please feel free to take one and….. spread the word.

Corner of Elderberry Lane and Poplar Road, Comfort Cove.

I always read. You know how sharks have to keep swimming or they die? I’m like that. If I stop reading, I die.  Patrick Rothfuss

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chile…….a culinary tale.

FeaturedChile…….a culinary tale.

When we weren’t hiking the trails, mountains and in the villages with Foothills Hiking Chile, we were walking in San Fernando, in Santa Cruz, in Chimbarongo and in Santiago.  In San Fernando, we happened upon a lovely restaurant and had dinner there.  Most of the restaurants around our hotel in San Fernando were of the  fast food variety, so we were ready for a nice dinner  and my husband, somehow learning from the waiter that this dish contained meat, promptly ordered it.

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Chorrillana

Chorrillana is a Chilean dish that is made with french fries topped with different kinds of meat, sausages, caramelized onions and right at the top…..two fried or scrambled eggs.

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A lovely salad.

 

Pepino Dulce

We purchased this at the  supermercado (supermarket) across from Hotel Espanol.  It is a fruit that tastes like a cucumber.

 

San Fernando

Begging  for this cup at the cafe that we visited did not sway the server….. “No, no, no, I cannot sell it.”

Happy Hour at Hotel Espanol
Happy Hour at Hotel Espanol

This was our own delicious feast that we bought at the market……it went over very well for our Happy Hour.

Milk and tea
Milk and tea…..a great way to learn Spanish.

 

San Fernando Market

 

I bought these at the market and was told to boil them for an hour and sprinkle with cinnamon…. I believe they were some variety of apricot.

 

Market San Fernando
At the market.

I love this picture. I asked if I could take her picture and she was so pleased.

 

 

The ‘mason jar’ bag ( a gift from my daughter) came in handy when I bought olives at the market.

 

Wine Festival in Santa Cruz

 

Using a hairdryer to rekindle the barbecue coals.

 

Cooking Class….Cazuela de Ave

Cazuela de Ave is the national dish of Chile.  Chicken, vegetables, salt and pepper, cloves, coriander, paprika is used in this recipe, where we would probably use turnip, butternut squash or pumpkin is used. I don’t know if turnip is grown in Chile, but there was none to be found in the supermarkets or local market.

 

……a new drink.

In the little mountain village of Termas del Falco, the electricity is only on between 8 pm and midnight. This little bar had a interesting refreshment…a stout beer mixed with a can of condensed milk. Ordinarily a blender would be used, but because there was no power at this time of day, it was simply whisked with a fork.

 

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Mote Con Huesillo

While we were seeing the historic San Cristobal Hill in Santiago, we saw people drinking this interesting concoction …roughly translated it is peaches with wheat.  The ingredients are dried peach halves, sugar, cinnamon stick, lemon or orange peel, water and one cup cooked pearl barley or wheat berries.  It is very, very popular in Chile and while I enjoyed it, I don’t think it would be a favourite of mine.

 

A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart who looks at her watch.

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Chile you were an amazing experience.

 

 

 

Cull’s Point Lookout Trail

FeaturedCull’s Point Lookout Trail

….gets some clearing and some new signs.

 

 

The trail from the sign in to the actual lookout is approximately 1/2 km and today is still snow covered in places.

We are very fortunate here in the Cove that in 1977, Kevin Head and 15 others developed this trail as a part of a summer works program.  Later Gordon White,  Keith Copper and others involved with the town council at the time (still gathering information on this)  made the trail longer and  it now goes around the headlands and coves, ending near the Wild Bight Road. This is not a long trail, ( approximately 3 km return) but I find it quite relaxing and peaceful.

 

 

Tenacity

 

 

 

New signs

 

 

This first lookout along the trail is perhaps my favourite. It is a great place to stop and maybe have a cup of tea, being careful not to go too close to the edge of the cliff. Later there will probably be an Osprey’s nest on the top of the sea stack. We have stopped to watch the birds guard the nest when out in our boat.