A Short Tale With the Possiblity of Unlimited Treks

FeaturedA Short Tale With the Possiblity of Unlimited Treks

What kind of life can you have in a house without books? Sherman Alexie

A house without books is certainly not one I would want and parents and grandparents who do not read to their children are not people I understand.

 

Digging the hole for the post.

Little Free Libraries are found all over the world and having seen them in various locations in our province, I wanted one. Seeing  and reading about the one in Green’s Harbour, Trinty Bay closed the deal for me. Thankfully my husband agree to make me one and because the ground was frozen, it had to wait until this week to be erected.

 

This is now extra special because two of our grandchildren are here and helped us with the set up.

Children are made readers on the laps of their parents.  Emilie Buchwald

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Preparing to cut the ribbon.

 

Libraries will get you through times of no money better than money will get you through times of no libraries.   Anne Herbert

I am blessed in that even though my grandchildren love their devices, they are avid readers.

 

Official Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

 

I am thrilled that two people have already stopped by to get  books and another left some books.

Fill your house with stacks of books, in all the crannies and all the nooks.  Dr. Seuss

 

The sign reads “Take a book, leave a book”, but if you don’t have one to leave, please feel free to take one and….. spread the word.

Corner of Elderberry Lane and Poplar Road, Comfort Cove.

I always read. You know how sharks have to keep swimming or they die? I’m like that. If I stop reading, I die.  Patrick Rothfuss

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chile…….a culinary tale.

FeaturedChile…….a culinary tale.

When we weren’t hiking the trails, mountains and in the villages with Foothills Hiking Chile, we were walking in San Fernando, in Santa Cruz, in Chimbarongo and in Santiago.  In San Fernando, we happened upon a lovely restaurant and had dinner there.  Most of the restaurants around our hotel in San Fernando were of the  fast food variety, so we were ready for a nice dinner  and my husband, somehow learning from the waiter that this dish contained meat, promptly ordered it.

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Chorrillana

Chorrillana is a Chilean dish that is made with french fries topped with different kinds of meat, sausages, caramelized onions and right at the top…..two fried or scrambled eggs.

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A lovely salad.

 

Pepino Dulce

We purchased this at the  supermercado (supermarket) across from Hotel Espanol.  It is a fruit that tastes like a cucumber.

 

San Fernando

Begging  for this cup at the cafe that we visited did not sway the server….. “No, no, no, I cannot sell it.”

Happy Hour at Hotel Espanol
Happy Hour at Hotel Espanol

This was our own delicious feast that we bought at the market……it went over very well for our Happy Hour.

Milk and tea
Milk and tea…..a great way to learn Spanish.

 

San Fernando Market

 

I bought these at the market and was told to boil them for an hour and sprinkle with cinnamon…. I believe they were some variety of apricot.

 

Market San Fernando
At the market.

I love this picture. I asked if I could take her picture and she was so pleased.

 

 

The ‘mason jar’ bag ( a gift from my daughter) came in handy when I bought olives at the market.

 

Wine Festival in Santa Cruz

 

Using a hairdryer to rekindle the barbecue coals.

 

Cooking Class….Cazuela de Ave

Cazuela de Ave is the national dish of Chile.  Chicken, vegetables, salt and pepper, cloves, coriander, paprika is used in this recipe, where we would probably use turnip, butternut squash or pumpkin is used. I don’t know if turnip is grown in Chile, but there was none to be found in the supermarkets or local market.

 

……a new drink.

In the little mountain village of Termas del Falco, the electricity is only on between 8 pm and midnight. This little bar had a interesting refreshment…a stout beer mixed with a can of condensed milk. Ordinarily a blender would be used, but because there was no power at this time of day, it was simply whisked with a fork.

 

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Mote Con Huesillo

While we were seeing the historic San Cristobal Hill in Santiago, we saw people drinking this interesting concoction …roughly translated it is peaches with wheat.  The ingredients are dried peach halves, sugar, cinnamon stick, lemon or orange peel, water and one cup cooked pearl barley or wheat berries.  It is very, very popular in Chile and while I enjoyed it, I don’t think it would be a favourite of mine.

 

A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart who looks at her watch.

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Chile you were an amazing experience.

 

 

 

Cull’s Point Lookout Trail

FeaturedCull’s Point Lookout Trail

….gets some clearing and some new signs.

 

 

The trail from the sign in to the actual lookout is approximately 1/2 km and today is still snow covered in places.

We are very fortunate here in the Cove that in 1977, Kevin Head and 15 others developed this trail as a part of a summer works program.  Later Gordon White,  Keith Copper and others involved with the town council at the time (still gathering information on this)  made the trail longer and  it now goes around the headlands and coves, ending near the Wild Bight Road. This is not a long trail, ( approximately 3 km return) but I find it quite relaxing and peaceful.

 

 

Tenacity

 

 

 

New signs

 

 

This first lookout along the trail is perhaps my favourite. It is a great place to stop and maybe have a cup of tea, being careful not to go too close to the edge of the cliff. Later there will probably be an Osprey’s nest on the top of the sea stack. We have stopped to watch the birds guard the nest when out in our boat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I absolutely love this lichen on the white spruce and want to decorate  them with red berries. 🙂

 

 

 

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These windfalls and others have now been cleared.

 

 

A beautiful day, sunny and warm on March 31!

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The trail as of today is quite slippery in places. Hiking stick(s) and cleats are recommended.

 

 

 

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Doctor’s Hill

In the background you can see Doctor’s Hill

Is there anything that is better than to be out walking in the clear air?  In Praise of Walking by Thomas A. Clark

 

Finding Dinosaur Tracks in the Andes…

FeaturedFinding Dinosaur Tracks in the Andes…

..from Newfoundland to Chile Part IV.

 

 

 

The hike in Termas del Flaco , described below, was indeed an adventure and in some ways surreal. Seeing dinosaur tracks in the longest  mountain chain in the world, left behind by creatures that walked the earth when South America and Africa formed one tectonic plate, was pretty spectacular!   Chile

…….this is an endeavour for the obsessed or the adventurous but no matter who you are, you will be left amazed by the visible footprints left by dinosaurs some 150 million years ago.   All you’ve ever wanted to Know about Dinosaurs in Chile  HelenLCordery

But before we could start our hike we had to travel to Termas del Flaco. This in itself is somewhat of an adventure. The  dirt road is approximately 77 km, narrow and winding …looking down is sometimes not advisable. It allows only one way traffic. If you are up at Termas del Flaco, you must leave to come down by 2’clock so those below can start the journey up the mountain by 4 pm. Both ends are monitored by police.     Termas del Flaco – dangerous roads Chile   Truthfully it wasn’t that bad and we had the utmost confidence in our driver, Jose from Foothills Hiking.

The road up to the village is only open from December to April and during the winter (May to November), the people all move down to San Fernando/Puente Negro and the surrounding area.

 

 

 

First we had to wait until the traffic jam dispersed.:)

 

 

Waiting our turn to take the road up to Termas del Flaco

 

 

 

 

 I found the mixture of brilliant sun and then shade from the mountain peaks fascinating.

 

 

“Awesome is Everywhere”

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Far below in the village of Termas del Flaco is a sanatorium that was built in the 1930s.  It was never opened and never used.

 

 

Andes

 

 

We made it!

 

 

Foothills Hiking Chile

 

 

I really don’t know how Johanna will celebrate her next birthday!

 

 

This world is an offering to you.

 

El Milagro de los Andes……from Newfoundland to Chile Part III

FeaturedEl Milagro de los Andes……from Newfoundland to Chile Part III

 

Mosaic depicting Uruguay Plane Crash
Visiting the mural

Day four with  Foothills Hiking Chile  involved a  3 1/2 hour hike around Puente Negro itself; and while there were so many interesting things covered on this trek, the most haunting and memorable experience was entering the Plaza del Arriero and finding the
mural depicting the 1972 Uruguay Air crash.

I had heard of this horrific, yet beautiful and amazing story before but never, never did I ever think I would be this close to where it actually happened.

 

Mosaic depicting Uruguay Plane Crash
Mosaic depicting Uruguay Plane Crash

Elizabeth telling us the details of the crash and the history behind this  beautiful mural.

 

 

 

The mosaic begins with the Uruguayan flag and ends with the Chilean flag and is 48 meters long. It depicts the crash site, the walk out and the rescue, as well as, the rugged mountain ranges of the Andes and the birds, flora and fauna.  Pedro Marchant is the designer of the mosaic but  other artists worked on it. We were so awe struck and interested in this aspect of our hike that unfortunately we did not get great pictures!

The activity of the Puente Negro community was actively participated, an opportunity in which the mural designed by Professor Pedro Marchant was inaugurated and executed by the Fabiola Diaz graduate in arts.

For his part, Professor Pedro Marchant, said the mosaic begins with the Uruguayan flag and ends with the Chilean flag,…………………The teacher of the Lyceum Neandro Schilling explained that when designing the mural he wanted to incorporate a series of episodes that marked the accident and subsequent rescue, not leaving aside our flora and fauna.  “in the work could not be absent the rugged mountain ranges, the condor, the guanaco and the puma,” Merchant said.

Meanwhile, the artist Fabiola Diaz, said that “we have been working for some time on the patrimonial rescue and this work is added to the sculpture in tribute to the muleteers that exists in this square.”

Diaz explained  that “as a part of the rescue of the historical heritage of this event that impacted the world, it was decided to make this mosaic to create a new tourist attraction, along with being able to share this beautiful technique with the inhabitants of Puente Negro.”

The mural was financed by Tinguiririca Energia and the Villas Cordilleras Commiittee, with the support of the Pro sewage Committee and the Municipality of San Fernando.

 

The information above was taken from this site  https://cronicanoticiosa.com/  which reported from Chile on the murals. I used Google translator to translate from Spanish to English. It gives some very important information on the creation of the mural.

Muleteers sculptors in the park.  Elizabeth  told us they were all made from scrap metal…just beautiful.

 

Mosaic depicting Uruguay Plane Crash
Flag of Chile at the end.

In October of 1972 the Old Christians Rugby team from Uruguay chartered a Uruguayan Air Force plane to fly them to Santiago, Chile for a rugby match………they never made it. The plane crashed in the Andes due to weather and pilot error.  Sixteen out of the forty-five survived and stayed alive for over two months  in the most brutal conditions!

The details and story of this horrific crash have been documented many times….in newspaper articles, books and movies.

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These books may be at your local library. I know they can be ordered through Amazon.

I highly recommend watching the movie Alive which can be purchased through  Amazon  and also can be  found on Apple TV to rent or buy.  There are also many news articles and interviews  about/with some of the survivors, especially Dr. Roberto Canessa and Nando Parrado.

Mosaic depicting Uruguay Plane Crash
Mosaic depicting Uruguay Plane Crash

 

Every day when I look at myself in the mirror, I thank God the same old jerk is still staring back at me.   Dr. Roberto Canessa

“As we used to say in the mountains,  “Breathe. Breathe again. With every breath, you are alive.” After all these years, this is still the best advice I can give you: Savor your existence. Live every moment. Do not waste a breath.”       Nando Parrado

 

El Milagro de los Andes————Miracle of the Andes.

 

From Newfoundland to Chile….Part II

FeaturedFrom Newfoundland to Chile….Part II

Foothills Hiking is located in Puente Negro, Chile. Puente Negro is approximately 17 km from San Fernando, the capital city of the province of Colchagua.

As a part of our package with Foothills Hiking , we stayed at Cabanas Puente Negro and the owners Eugenio and Paula were friendly, helpful and kind despite our not speaking Spanish! Communication was always a challenge wherever we went, but with Google translator, much laughter and frustration we managed.

 

 

The grounds are quite interesting with cows, horses, dogs, cats, bulls and hens. Quite often the cats would lie on our doorstep and the hens would fly up from the bushes as we walked up to the main house for our breakfast! The sunrise over the mountains was always spectacular and breakfast was  delicious and soooo much fun! Meeting strangers at 7:30 am can be awkward but both Paula and Eugenio made us feel at home.

 

Lighting the heater in our cabin so we could shower, breakfast and a display of teapots to make me feel at home.

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Mate/Donkey Tea!!!

 

Eugenio, using many antics, made us mate tea ……. describing it as ‘donkey tea’…make you kick up your heels like a donkey!

It is made from steeping dried yerba mate leaves in hot water and is served in a cup with a straw, the straw was traditionally made of silver. Today it can be made of nickel silver, stainless steel or hollow stemmed cane. The cup is shared by everyone at the table. We laughed so much this morning that we barely had energy to hike.

 

 

Cabanas Puente Negro

Breakfast at 7:30 and then the morning hike began at 8:30.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Birds, espino trees, eucalyptus, an interesting fence, beautiful mountain peaks and sunshine are all a part of the hike today.

 

 

Bathing our feet in the Rio Claro

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“I grew up in this town, my poetry was born between hill and river, it took its voice from the rain, and like the timber, it steeped itself in the forests.”  Pablo Neruda

Please click the link above for more information on Foothills Hiking and follow my blog for more posts on our adventure in Chile.

 

 

A Walkabout with a Talented Tale

FeaturedA Walkabout with a Talented Tale

In September of 2018, Botwood NL hosted the Global Mural Arts Conference. This is no small feat for a town of its size. Botwood Mural Arts Society began in 2010 during the town’s Come Home Year and has grown from there. Please make the time to visit the link below.

Botwood Murals

 

Before our walkabout, nine of us gathered for a lovely brunch at the Dockside Restaurant. Dockside Restaurant     The exterior of the restaurant is rather nondescript, but the inside is unique and so very interesting. We went for the Sunday brunch and it was excellent. An added bonus is the featured art and the showing of so much history. Check their Facebook page as well as the link above. They are open all year but call 709 257 3179 for hours.

 

 

These artists were just finishing this mural and we stopped and talked with them. She was from Argentina and was thoroughly enjoying her time in Newfoundland.

 

 

Clash of Cultures….Craig Goudie

This was my sister’s favourite. I was torn between this and The Two R’s by Craig Goudie, an artist from Grand Falls-Windsor. The detail boggles my mind and it is such a powerful part of our history.

 

 

 

Artist Craig Goudie…painted on Botwood library

 

…….this is definitely my favourite! It’s ingenious how he painted the books as fishing stages (rooms) and used pencils for the shores (supports)…..and the paper boats! Seriously, you can’t get any better with creative thinking……and the colours!

 

Our history.

 

 

Fire hall Mural

 

Continuing our walkabout and seeing still more amazing murals.

 

 

You really need to read everything and look closely at every detail.

 

The railway through Botwood depicted in a mural and what a story it tells.  A section of the old railway bed now provides a scenic walk.

Botwood has four interconnected hiking trails Killick Island 5 kms, Lighthouse Point, Old Railway Link, and King Ridge Lookout. They are not challenging and quite lovely. If you need information, please call 709 257 3022.

My niece, Adrienne recently sent me a quote by John Muir  regarding hiking and how he didn’t particularly like the word ‘hike’, he prefers saunter (through the mountains)….Botwood and its murals need you to saunter through the town and fill your senses with imagery, history and pure wonder.

The miracle is not to walk on water, the miracle is to walk on the green earth in the present moment, to appreciate the peace and beauty that are available now. ….  Thich Nhat Hamh

A Trek Through Gaultois

FeaturedA Trek Through Gaultois

Gaultois is a tiny community on Long Island on Newfoundland’s South Coast. It is a short ferry ride from Hermitage across 6 km of ocean and takes approximately 20 mins. Your vehicle will be left in Hermitage, as there are no roads in Gaultois.

 

map

Map image courtesy of Newfoundland Labrador Transportation and Works

 

Leaving Hermitage with beautiful views along the way.

 

Fjords, beautiful vistas and no fog, a gift from September.

 

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Hmmmmmmm………………….

 

Arriving in Gaultois.

 

 Anyone need a cab?

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The terrible news came in 1990.

Gaultois was once a thriving community.  Fishery Products International decided to close the fish plant in 1990 because it had too many plants on the south coast. It is a testament to the tenacity and hard work of the people of Gaultois that approximately 100 people still live there. Most want to resettle but still haven’t reached a majority vote.

 

The ferry leaves and we begin our trek up to Gaultois.

Gaultois is home to three, possibly four (it depends on who you talk to :))  distinct areas, The Valley, The Room, The Point and The Bottom.

Trekking along.

We had a great lunch at The Gaultois Inn  and then continued our walk.

 

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Unfortunately we didn’t have time to do this trail to the abandoned community of Piccaire.

 

 

 

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School Transportation.

I was surprised to learn that there are still 17 students, with two teachers in Gaultois.  As we were leaving , some of the older students zoomed up on their dirt bikes or quads and took the 3:30 pm ferry to Hermitage. They planned to return on the 7 pm ferry.  Many residents of Gaultios have cars and trucks that they leave in Hermitage.

 

 

I like seeing clothes drying on clotheslines, but these disturbed me. I imagined the hard work involved pushing the clothesline up hill  and then the dust from the moving  quads blowing on the other two.

 

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Bike in Gaultois

This photo tells visually how I felt when I left Gaultois. Overcome with sadness.

I hesitated in writing this in the event that some of the current residents of the community read this post; but in doing a little research, I found that although the town is somewhat divided on resettlement, most are eager to leave and start anew. There are some plans in the works for rejuvenation, and if that is what the residents want, I wish them well.

Gaultois, plan a visit, stay at the inn, do a walkabout or two, talk to the locals and form your own thoughts and opinions.

 

“Don’t walk behind me, I may not lead.”  ? author

 

Photos L. Fudge

Restoring My Soul In Harbour Breton

FeaturedRestoring My Soul In Harbour Breton

Harbour Breton on Newfoundland’s South Coast should be on everyone’s bucket list. It is the home of amazing fjords, cliffs and mountains, storytelling beaches and ocean, fields of Canada burnet (bottle brush), multi-coloured seaweed and amazing hiking trails.

Please click the link below for more information.

Harbour Breton

The hiking trail which starts in Deadman’s Cove and connects with One Mile Pond Is approximately 5 km (one way) and is almost surreal in its beauty.

The Dalai Lama was posed this question by F. Von Schonborn “Never before has there been so much affluence for such large segments of the population in the West. And yet more and more people appear to be asking: Does this whole thing-do our lives- have any kind of purpose?”   A part of his response was “…………….if we are discontent, even the most beautiful things will rub us the wrong way. Then we are gripped by anger and hatred for ourselves and others. Then we no longer feel good in our own skin. We cannot enjoy a beautiful flower, the song of a bird, or the smile of a child. This shows how important is is for us to live in harmony with ourselves.”  Hiking and nature keep me grounded and, finally, comfortable in my own skin.

Seaweed in Vase
Seaweed in a Vase  L. Fudge/C. Fudge

 

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A Gift From the Sea Photo L. Fudge/C. Fudge

I have never seen such different colours/shades of seaweed.

Primrose? along the trail.

 

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After climbing Iron Skull Mountain the previous day, this was the perfect trail to rejuvenate us.

Chinese architecture:)

Around the pond.

 

There are walks on which I lose myself, walks which return me to myself again.

  In Praise of Walking Thomas A. Clark

 

 

There are many other great hiking trails and scenic vistas in Harbour Breton and although we did see much of the town, we moved on. Gun Hill Hike and others are on my radar for next year.

Thanks to my husband, sister and brother in law for a most memorable road trip.

Photos L. Fudge

 

Iron Skull Mountain Trail, Belleoram

FeaturedIron Skull Mountain Trail, Belleoram

“I see a picture of Iron Skull, and it brings a tear to my eye,
For I know, she stands guard o’er the birthplace of this Newfie boy”.

Johnny Drake/The Dorymen

 

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Iron Skull Mountain is the highest mountain in Fortune Bay and is 1129 feet/344 meters high. I would rate this trail as difficult and recommend the use of a hiking stick.  Allow 4 to 5 hours (return) for the hike.

I also suggest that when you start the final rocky climb up,  you leave some sort of marker to the wooded trail area. When we started down, we had a little difficulty connecting with the trail again.  My husband climbed down through the trees walked across the mountain until he connected with the trail and then let us know his whereabouts. It was easy to see the marsh that we had walked over far below, but hard to distinguish the actual trail.

 

But before we begin…… a little tour of Belleoram which is on the south coast of Newfoundland in Fortune Bay.

 

While Belleoram is no longer the bustling center it once was, it is still a community with a million dollar view.  It has a population of approximately 400 and I saw four (there may be more), convenience stores!

The mountains and hills surrounding Belleoram, together with the vibrant blue of the ocean, provide a breathtaking scene that is spellbinding.

 

…….and away we go.

The trail into the actual beginning of the trek up takes approximately 40 mins. and is overgrown but not without interest.

 

Movement is a medicine for creating change in a person’s physical, emotional, and mental states.    Carol Welch

 

 

We begin the climb. My sister told me about this hike and we, along with my husband, left early in the morning.  There have been many bear sightings in this area recently. Fortunately we didn’t see one, but saw tracks and other signs.

 

 

 

Headin’ Home

John Drake….The Dorymen

Many years have gone by since I left my Fortune Bay home,
Full of dreams and ambitions, as a young man I wanted to roam;
But now things are different, I’m older and wiser, I guess,
And I’d love to return to that homeland that I love the best.

My friends and relations, I miss them more every day,
And in dreams I go back to my childhood down in old Fortune Bay;
I see a picture of Iron Skull, and it brings a tear to my eye,
For I know, she stands guard o’er the birthplace of this Newfie boy.

And I leave Bishops Falls, head down that Bay D’Espoir Road,
There’s a lump in my throat, son, ’cause I know that I’m headin’ home;
And when I reach St Jacques, I know everything is alright,
I got two miles to go and I’ll be in Belleoram tonight.

That old Fishermen’s Lodge is now a modern day home,
The roads, they are paved, and them old fishing schooners are gone;
That old church looks the same as it did when I sang in the choir,
The Orange Lodge gave its music to the lounge on the government wharf.

The dories made way for the faster and modern speed boat,
As you walk around town, you’ll not see a sheep, cow, or goat;
The steamers don’t call here, they are a thing of the past,
Now, it’s phoned-home visits, my, things are changing so fast.

My memories may fail me, but I feel like a king when I say,
I’m a proud Newfoundlander from Belleoram, down in old Fortune Bay.

And I leave Bishops Falls, head down that Bay D’Espoir Road,
There’s a lump in my throat, son, ’cause I know that I’m headin’ home;
And when I reach St Jacques, I know everything is alright,
I got two miles to go and I’ll be in Belleoram tonight.
Just two miles to go and I’ll be in Belleoram tonight.

####…. John Henry Drake [1936-2006] of Belleoram, NL (Headin’ Home, SWC Productions) ….####

Johnny Drake, along with Thomas G (Tom) Rose [1940-?] of Bay Du Nord, NL, co-founded The Dorymen in 1969.

 

 

He has reached home.

 

 

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“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds.”    Edward Abbey

 

Another great adventure with my husband and sister!

 

Photos by L. Fudge

A Stroll Through Change Islands

FeaturedA Stroll Through Change Islands

Change Islands is on the northeast coast of Newfoundland and Labrador and is comprised of three islands, two of which are occupied. For more information on Change Islands please visit this link.

 

This fence caught my eye, as did the street signs in the shape of a fish.

 

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Beautiful old United Church. The doors were unlocked so I actually got to see the interior.

 

 

Unique buildings which all have a curved roof.  This curved roof design  was common  on Change Islands but rarely found elsewhere in Newfoundland. The yellow house was a cottage built  in the early 1900’s by Walter and Raymond Torraville.

 

I feel we are all islands – in a common sea.  Anne Morrow Lindbergh

 

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A patchwork roof….thrifty and eye pleasing.

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Driving across the tickle (Newfoundland word for ‘narrow strait’) on the Spencer Bridge, this lovely pop of colour makes a welcoming statement.

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Salt in the air in the middle of nowhere.  (Pinterest)

 

This is not a walk where you would ever be bored.

 

While there I met some interesting people who have bought summer homes on Change Islands.  They love this place and enjoy the many opportunities for painting and photography. One of the people I met is a brilliant artist  Susan Abma    Susan graciously showed us some of her paintings. Please click the link to view some of her work.

 

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You can find me where the music meets the ocean.

 

Beautiful wildflowers along the way….Butter and Eggs.

Hooded ladies’-tresses……..a first time ID for me.

Musk mallow

 

For all your shopping needs……….

 

I live in a very small house, but my windows look out on a very large world.   Confucius

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For the right understanding of a landscape,  information must come to the intelligence from all the senses.   Thomas A. Clark   In Praise of Walking

 

I hope you have enjoyed your walk through Change Islands. For information on the  ferry schedule from Farewell to Change Islands and Fogo, please call 1 888 638 5454.

 

Photos L & C Fudge

 

 

A truly happy person is one who can……..

FeaturedA truly happy person is one who can……..

…..enjoy the scenery while on a detour. (Anonymous)

We spent some time in Eastport in October 2017 and enjoyed many delicious meals, shows and activities. Finding ourselves with some time to spare between activities, we decided to hike the Sandy Cove Look-Out trail. It was an overcast dreary day and the hike was uphill but not very long.

The trail winds through trees and is fairly nondescript, but I always like to finish a trail once I have started, so we kept going.

We have to take personal responsibility for uplifting our lives. The Sacred Path of the Warrior Chogyam Trungpa

The trail was wet, dark and grey.

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At the top, the Canadian flag flies precariously in the wind.

In summer, beautiful Sandy Cove beach is a favourite of mine.

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My husband saw this beautiful Caribou Moss and took photos.


It was the bright spot of the hike and I am so glad we took the detour.

“But,in my simple ignorance, suppose
That self-same Power that brought me there
brought you.”
The Rhodora Ralph Waldo Emerson

photos L & C Fudge

Magical Cape Spear

FeaturedMagical Cape Spear

Hiking around the boardwalks and trails of Cape Spear is always beautiful and for me spiritual; hiking it with one of my grandchildren is pure magic.

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“Walking gives freedom. When you walk you can determine your own tempo. You can choose your own course. You can think whatever you want.”      Nina Kuscik

Normally, I would agree with this quote but in this case, my four year old grandson chose the tempo and the course, and my thinking was limited to ….stay away from the cliffs, do not lose sight of him, do not run, do not spoil his day with too many warnings……….

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Wait for me!

On my previous visits to Cape Spear, I had never explored this!

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Surely with this workout, he will sleep tonight!

I truly do not understand people who abuse our earth with excess garbage, it will only sustain us for so long. Awesome is everywhere, let’s preserve it.

Photos by L. Fudge

Cape Spear, Newfoundland …..add it to your bucket list!

“Walk as if you are  kissing the earth with your feet. No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path.” Buddha