Fall, Food & Foliage in the Cove

FeaturedFall, Food & Foliage in the Cove

Fall is my absolute favourite season. I am rather new at this gathering and preserving and to my surprise, I like it. I love experimenting with herbs and trying many of Newfoundland’s vegetables and fruits in different ways. Black Currants in a green salad, partridgeberries in stuffing, apples in soup stock, pears in stir fries, turnip fries, zucchini fries, roasted beet, roasted carrot and apple soup, hot peppers in cabbage rolls, damson jam with very little sugar, etc.,etc.

Aunt Molly Ground Cherries

This plant was given to us by a friend. I had never heard of them.

I made the tray using a print by Jeannette Pope. Check out her Facebook page….Art by Jeannette

Aunt Molly Ground Cherry is an outstanding variety that originated in Poland. Fruits are 1.3-1.8cm(1/2” to3/4”) in diameter. Fruits mature to a golden orange colour and drop to the ground in their husks when ripe.”

http://mckenzieseeds.com

Aunt Molly Ground Cherry

Cindy’s Pears

Slow cooker applesauce and autumn, a combination that works well.

I was becoming a little distraught because of our having a very wet and foggy October here on the northeast coast but October has reaffirmed my belief in her today, and I can honestly say:

I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Keep it simple.

October Gave a Party….

FeaturedOctober Gave a Party….

The leaves by hundreds came..

The Chestnuts, Oaks and Maples,

And leaves of every name.

The Sunshine spread a carpet,

And everything was grand,

Miss Weather led the dancing,

Professor Wind the band.

October’s Party by George Cooper

Corner Brook provided a perfect venue for October’s Party. We did a couple of trails but none as beautiful as those in and around Margaret Bowater Park.

Corner Brook, Newfoundland

Glynmill Inn through the trees. The inn was built in 1923 by architect Andrew Cobb.

http://steelhotels.com

The Chestnuts came in yellow,

The Oaks in crimson dressed;

The lovely Misses Maple

In scarlet looked their best;

All balanced to their partners,

And gaily fluttered by;

The sight was like a rainbow

New fallen from the sky.

George Cooper

Maybe you are searching among the branches for what only appears in the roots.

Rumi

Walking in the woods is one of my favourite things to do.

Then, in the rustic hollow,

at hide and seek they played,

The party closed at sundown,

And everybody stayed.

Professor Wind played louder;

They flew along the ground;

And then the party ended

In jolly ”hands around.

George Cooper
Diving for lunch.

Go and explore.

Steve’s Trail….a wild surprise.

FeaturedSteve’s Trail….a wild surprise.

Driving along the Northern Peninsula highway (Viking Trail), we decided to turn off at Broom Point. Broom Point is a restored fishing premise in Gros Morne National Park. I wasn’t overly excited about doing this, thinking this would be more a thing for tourists. In the parking lot we found a lovely surprise, two signs, one showing Broom Point and the other Steve’s Trail.

A very short trail but so worth doing.

I love walking through gnarly, windswept trees.

Yellow Jewelweed (Impatiens pallida)

………..and finding surprises along the way.

Grouse

Like us, this grouse was just out for a walk on this wild, windy day.

And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul.

John Muir

We come to the end of the trail to a blustery, wind tossed ocean.

This is my happy.

We decided to explore further and increased the length of our walk.

Caves and rock formations to boggle the mind.

I’ve seen the devil’s footprints in Keels Newfoundland, dinosaur tracks in Chile and now (Identified by me:)), sea monster tracks on the Northern Peninsula.

Never lose your sense of wonder.

Nurse Myra Bennett Centre for the Performing Arts…….

FeaturedNurse Myra Bennett Centre for the Performing Arts…….

…..a tale, with a short walk.

The new Nurse Myra Bennett Centre for the Performing Arts in Cow Head is a pleasure to visit. We attended the dinner theatre there.

http://theatrenewfoundland.com

You may find the book The SS Ethie and the Hero Dog by Bruce Ricketts interesting. A short book, only 68 pages.

Then on to St Mary’s Botanical Garden in Cow Head. Many of the flowers have lost their bloom and the photos were taken just before dark, but you can still feel the peace and care that went into creating this area.

What a lovely, tranquil place right in the centre of the community.

Walking around little communities is a thing I love to do. You miss so much by simply driving through.

Everywhere is walking distance if you have the time.

Steven Wright

Oh world, I cannot hold you close enough!

FeaturedOh world, I cannot hold you close enough!

God’s world

Edna St. Vincent Millay

The Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland and Labrador is an all consuming feast for the senses. The Tablelands are a geological wonder, but first let’s see a little of delightful Woody Point.

A small, but lovely RV park just outside Woody Point and it has a Little Free Library!

A cozy little cottage with just a bed and an amazing view.

Then on to Woody Point for a little hike which we extended by walking around the town.

Is there anything that is better than to be out, walking, in the clear air?

In Praise of Walking by Thomas A. Clark

So, so glad my husband is using his camera again. Driftwood art.

Beautiful Woody Point.

For more on Woody Point please check my earlier blog posts.

Then, a short distance away a totally different kind of beauty is found in the Tablelands.

WOW!

Change Islands

FeaturedChange Islands

Now shall I walk? ”Ride,” Pleasure said: ”Walk,” Joy replied

W. H. Davies

After Saturday’s heat and humidity, the much cooler temperatures made perfect conditions for doing this hike yet again. The trail has had upgrades since we hiked it two years ago.

Interesting? Deposited in what Age?

I would rate this trail as moderate, hiking pole recommended. I loved the cold ocean air after the humidity we had experienced previously.

Early morning walk in Change Islands.

Susan Abma has just opened her studio on Change Islands. Visit Sea Salt Studio’s Facebook page and be sure and stop in and visit with Susan and Morris when you visit Change Island. I recently bought one of her smaller paintings and absolutely love her work.

Susan is from Alberta and fell in love with Change Islands some years ago .http://jensu.ca

This private summer residence is a colourful sight as you cross the tickle. We spent a great evening here with family and friends.

Catch the ferry at Farewell and go explore Change Islands.

Walking is good for solving problems – it’s like the feet are little psychiatrists.

Terri Guillemets

Come in and let me tell you a little about Tilt Cove.

FeaturedCome in and let me tell you a little about Tilt Cove.

I was one of many, many homes here in Tilt Cove. It was once a thriving town with all the amenities. Tilt Cove was first settled in 1813 and experienced two mining booms, from 1864 to 1917 and again in 1957 to 1967. At one time the population rose to approximately 2000. We even had a large facility that had two bowling lanes, two curling lanes and a separate area for a lounge and bar. We had work, music, laughter, parties, children, churches, great hunting, fishing, beautiful scenery, stunning ocean views and an overall prosperous community.

As with other early Newfoundland mines, the first Tilt Cove miners came from Cornwall, Wales and the mining techniques closely resembled those of the Cornish mines. Cable or ”Swansea” cars carried the ore down from the mine site along a tramway to a two storied pier where vessels waited to take the ore to the copper smelters in Swansea, Wales.

Community Stories. Baie Verte Peninsula Miners Museum VirtualMuseum.Ca

Now our claim to fame is this…………………..

Yes, four.

The lady who lived in the house below died a couple of years ago at the age of 92. She was the only one living on this side of ‘town’.

” She was a tiny little woman who loved to play the accordion and lived alone in this house for a number of years. She came home one day and the road on this side of the town wasn’t plowed. She climbed over snowbanks, used the ladder on the back of her house to get in through an upstairs window and called the mayor the next morning to come and shovel her out!” said a summer resident who used to live here.

We came here to visit this tiny town on the Baie Verte Peninsula because I wanted to see the monument that had been erected to the passengers and crew of the Queen of Swansea. A shipwreck and incomprehensible horror story that played out on Gull Island, not too far from Tilt Cove on December 12,1867.

https://archive.macleans.ca THE HORROR ON GULL ISLAND/Maclean’s/October 1969-The Maclean’s Archive

https://www.goodreads.com Desperation: The Queen of Swansea by Gary Collins

A summer resident pointed us in the right direction and we climbed the 65 stairs to the overgrown cemetery.

After some careful foot manoeuvres, my husband eventually found the monument. The cemetery is very overgrown and tricky to explore.

Come to Tilt Cove and hear the voices, feel the past in your walk-about, let your imagination wander and learn from the earth and wind.

La Scie……..another provincial gem to explore.

FeaturedLa Scie……..another provincial gem to explore.

We arrived in La Scie on a wet and cold Canada Day and stayed at Island Cove RV Park. We soon met Doug, Park Manager, I believe, and doer of all things. He brought us several print outs of hiking trails in the park and further down in La Scie.

The weather cleared around 3:30 and although it was still chilly, it was perfect for hitting the trails.

The French influence from centuries ago is quite evident in the signage all around town.

None of the trails are long and except for Boone’s Hill are easy/moderate.

Still overcast and cold but walking and hiking is a great way to stay warm, get exercise and explore something new.

Boone’s Hill is not a difficult hike, but it does have approximately 200 steps to the top lookout.

La Scie, Newfoundland

The walk around La Scie Harbour is beautiful.

A beautiful display of Lupins at Island Cove Park

Roses in the Duggan Family Graveyard.

Fireworks over La Scie Harbour.

Daily walking, in all weathers, in every season, becomes a sort of ground or continuum upon which the least emphatic occurrences are registered clearly.

In Praise of Walking Thomas A. Clark

Too Good Arm Hiking Trail

FeaturedToo Good Arm Hiking Trail

Just 25 kms from Twillingate is another little gem. Exit Route 346 onto Route 340, drive 12 kms down this road and you will find yourself in Too Good Arm. Another small Newfoundland outport with a unique name, but this one has a newly upgraded/built hiking trail.

According to MHA Derek Bennett, the trail was recently upgraded through a Community Employment Enhancement Program (CEEP). I believe this is a great use of government funds, providing work which in turn encourages people to explore, exercise, enjoy nature and overall maintain a healthy lifestyle.

The trail is not long, we clocked 3.33 kms return. It does seem longer because there are so many coves to walk to and if you explore further you will add to your hiking distance. Today was an absolutely gorgeous day in this almost snow-less January. The shrubs and lichen looked more like fall than mid winter.